Wednesday, July 18, 2012

SOG Seal Pup Fixed Blade Knife Review


The SOG SEAL Pup continues with the same service and quality of the well known SOG SEAL Knife, the knife used by the Navy SEALs. The SOG SEAL Pup has all the benefits of the original SEAL Knife, but in a smaller version. Everywhere you look people love the SOG SEAL Pup. It consistently gets great reviews all around. You will have a hard time finding a Survival Knife as good as this for such a great price.

The blade is made from AUS8 stainless steel and is partially serrated to provide easy rope cutting capabilities. I prefer the serrations on top of the top side of a blade but these serrations only cover a small portion of the sharp side of the blade and this survival knife just feels so right that I am willing to overlook that minor detail. The blade is powder coated to help increase strength and to provide corrosion resistance as well as reflection reduction. The blade is very easily managed at 4.75 inches in length. With the overall length at 9 inches you will have no problem wearing this knife for easy access whatever situation you find yourself in.


The SEAL Pup has a Zytel handle with diamond-knurled grip and is glass-reinforced so that you will be able to keep a handle on things, even when conditions aren’t the best. Survival Knife grips are a personal preference but I believe that once you hold this knife in your hand, your personal preference will lean towards the Zytel knurled grips. Rubberized grips flex slightly to provide a strong secure grip and I’m telling you, you could grease this handle up and still have a good grip (You shouldn’t grease the handle up though).

The SEAL Pup comes with a multi-mounting nylon sheath and the handle has a lanyard hole at the top. I prefer the Kydex sheath because it won’t retain moisture which in turn promotes corrosion (even stainless steel can corrode if it isn’t taken care of properly). The SOG M37-K is the same exact SOG Seal Pup Survival Knife but it replaces the nylon sheath with the kydex sheath. If you already have the kydex sheath for this survival knife or don’t mind the nylon sheath, then this is the survival knife for you. Otherwise, look at the SOG Specialty Knives & Tools M37-K Seal Pup Knife with Kydex Sheath. It won’t take much research to come to the conclusion that this is one of the best Survival Knives out there at this price. The SOG SEAL Pup is, without a doubt, one of the best survival knifes I have ever seen.


To buy or get more information on the SOG SEAL Pup 4.75" Powder Coated Combo Edge Blade with Nylon Sheath, click the link below.

SOG SEAL Pup 4.75" Powder Coated Combo Edge Blade with Nylon Sheath





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Wednesday, July 11, 2012

Case Stag Trapperlock Folding Knife Review


Almost too good to be true, the Case Stag Series 5154L Trapperlock takes an old but loved pocket knife and makes it better. If you already own the traditional model but secretly envy the newer one-handled locking folders, this is your chance to discreetly retire the Trapper slip joint and join modern society.

This really is the old reliable Case XX Trapper -- one of the company's most popular pocket folder knives since the Case company began producing knives in 1889 -- but with modern perks that are rapidly becoming standard features. The old Trapper opened with a thumb notch and snapped into place with a pressure-release spring bar (the slip joint method). The new Case Trapperlock Knife is a whole new beast. The Trapperlock's clip point blade spins open on a precision bearing, easy enough to flick open with the thumb in a one-handed movement. Fully open, the blade seats with a stout liner lock that holds the blade open until intentionally released by side pressure. There may no longer be the need for that cautious father-son discussion about how pocket knives tend to close up on a person's fingers if used incorrectly. This is a much safer and more practical knife.

Locked open, the Trapperlock Knife has much of the blade security of a small fixed blade, but still has the look of the classic Case pocket knife. Genuine stag antler handle slabs and polished nickel bolsters form the grip, and the knife folds to a convenient 4-1/8 inches with no sharp edges to wear holes in your pocket. In 2008, Case began production of three classic styles in the Trapperlock design including Yellow Handle, Red Bone, and this knife in India Stag.

I rate the Case Stag Trapperlock a solid 9.5 out of 10. This knife is yet another excellent example of the fine craftsmanship that marks Case knives.


To buy or get more information on the Case Genuine Stag TrapperLock 4-1/8" Closed (5154 SS) Gift Box/Tin, click the link below.

Case Genuine Stag TrapperLock 4-1/8" Closed (5154 SS) Gift Box/Tin




All Comments are Welcome and Appreciated.



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Thursday, July 5, 2012

Kershaw Clash Knife Review


The Kershaw Clash, model 1605, is possibly one of the more attractive assisted-open folding knives I've seen in a while. It fits the hand perfectly, is easy to use, and has a glass-filled nylon handle that's just grippy enough, but remains comfortable as you use it. The drop point blade has a nice belly and comes with a bead-blasted finish. I've used the Speedsafe-enabled Clash in a variety of applications and carried it for weeks. I have to say, once you pick up this knife and start to use it, you may not put it down again... at least not anywhere your friends might "accidentally" walk away with it!

Before doing a review on a knife, what I always do is open it up to see what it looks like, how it feels - and discern the intent of the blade. Is it tactical? Is it made for EDC? Will it blend? Often a blade has a specific purpose which governs its design and features, but sometimes a knife comes across as an all-around versatile tool that just seems "right". The Clash falls into the second category. It's not a tactical weapon. It doesn't have any features specifically for safety, or the workplace. It's not colorful or particularly rugged-looking. But it's got a nice shape - both to the blade and the handle. It "feels" right when you hold it, with excellent balance and just the right sizing to make it a great EDC (every day carry) knife.


Look at the drop point blade, for example. While some may not prefer this blade style, the Kershaw Clash Knife includes a nicely rounded belly on the blade that gives it a slight recurve, with a bit more girth and rigidity during use. It also allows you to "aim" the knife for more delicate and focused trimming or shaving as opposed to a flatter blade. The back of the blade lacks any real jimping (notches on the back side where your thumb rests in the forward position), but it has a smooth and comfortable depression. As such, this isn't a knife that's meant to be "wielded" so much as easily handled and controlled for general use.

And that general use doesn't mean you can't manhandle the Kershaw Clash 1605. The liner lock is thick, providing a solid pressure to stop the blade and hold it secure in the open position. At the same time, it's a simple thumb move to release it. The Speedsafe function worked flawlessly and I only noticed a slight amount of side-to-side wobble in the blade which I was able to remove by slightly tightening the Allen-head screw at the blade pivot point. I am not sure if this was just a QC (quality control) issue from the factory, or what, but the blade never loosened up again after I tightened it.


The texture on the glass-filled nylon handle isn't terribly rough, which is partly why the blade is so easy to hold and maneuver. It has just enough variance to give it a solid grip without being too aggressive. You're not likely to drop the Clash, or have it accidentally slip out of your hand while handling it. The included belt clip is unusually large - and by "large" I mean "fat". It's wider than what I typically see on EDC knives and, while robust, we questioned why Kershaw chose such a design. There is also a rather steep angle along the top of the clip, which helps it seat itself perfectly in pockets that flatten out (like the typical jean style) but which may prove to be awkward on pockets that angle all the way down to the bottom (as with some work pants).


The clip is also positioned such that the knife sticks out about 7/8 of an inch when you carry it and Kershaw could have saved 1/8-inch on this easily simply by shortening the distance from the holes to the top of the clip. The clip can be mounted to the bottom of the knife, but you can't reverse it to the other side for a left-hand carry.

Opening this knife is a most satisfying experience. The Speedsafe combined with the blade shape and size give it a very satisfying 'snap' on open. It's also loud and will get the attention of everyone in a small room (which could be good or bad, so exercise with caution). The Kershaw Clash Folding Knife is well-balanced and you can really wrap your hand all the way around it for near-perfect control over slicing, cutting and shaping. There are two positions my thumb liked to be in, depending upon whether I was looking for more control (on the curved part of the spine) or speed (on the small jimping ridges). I did everything with this knife, carrying it for weeks and opening boxes, cutting through nylon rope... it even served me well whittling up some sticks for hot dogs and various other food prep tasks on a recent family barbecue. Even after all that, the blade was relatively sharp, but we took out my Spyderco Tri-angle Sharpmaker and touched it up, noting that the 8CR13MOV stainless steel of this V-ground blade is a very easy material to sharpen. This is a Chinese steel that is comparable to AUS-8 and so far it's proven to be reliable and resistant to rust, though further use will tell over the long haul how well it withstands the elements. As with anything, good maintenance and care will help you enjoy your blade for a much longer time and Kershaw's limited lifetime warranty means that the blade is guaranteed against manufacturing defects (but not rust or damage from prying). They'll also sharpen your knife for free if you send it to them - you just need to pay for shipping to the company.

I rate the Kershaw Clash 1605 an 8 out of 10. If you want a nice EDC knife that has a versatile blade that is good for cutting, slicing and shaping, it's going to be difficult to top the Kershaw Clash 1605. I love the drop tip blade, and the entire knife just feels right. Weight, handling, and grip are all in good balance. The pocket clip could be improved, but it's not a very serious ding on an otherwise excellent knife. While I've used this blade as my EDC for the past several weeks, it's one that will be hard to give up. While it retails for $39.95, I've seen it online for a lot less than that, making it not only a great knife, but a great bargain.


To buy or get more information on the Kershaw Clash Model 1605 Assisted 3" Bead-Blast Plain Blade with Polyimide Handles, click the link below.

Kershaw Clash Assisted 3" Bead-Blast Plain Blade, Polyimide Handles




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